3 numbers that you must know about the water you drink

TDS in water

The water we drink everyday has minerals, salts and metals dissolved in it. These dissolved solids effect the taste, odor and quality of water. Whatever water purification method (RO purifiers, filter or bottled water) you adopt, it is very important to know the quality of the water your consume.

Some of the factors that determine the safety and quality of drinking water are:

Hard water and TDS

pH

It stands for power of Hydrogen. It measures how acidic or alkaline the water is. The figure ranges from 0-14 where pH 7 being neutral or pure, less than 7 indicates acidity and above 7 indicates alkalinity. The pH range of normal water  should be in the range  of 6 – 8.5.

Hardness

It indicates the concentration of calcium and magnesium ions present in water. The hardness of water measures the capacity of water to react with soap. Hard water require large amount of soap to produce lather. Hard water reacts with soap molecule and produces precipitate which can be seen as white deposition on the taps, bathroom fittings or kitchen utensils.

TDS

It is defines as “the inorganic salts and small amounts of organic matter present in solution in water. The principal constituents are usually calcium, magnesium, sodium, and potassium cations and carbonate, hydrogen carbonate, chloride, sulfate, and nitrate anions” (Source: WHO report, Guidelines for drinking-water quality, 2nd ed. Vol. 2. Health criteria and other supporting information). These dissolved solids affect the taste and quality of water.

So next time whenever you call for RO service or any other RO related help, ask the technician to test these 3 numbers. Permissible range of these numbers ensure purity and cleanliness of drinking water.

READ ALSO:  What is UV water purification?

As a service provider for home improvement and maintenance, Mr. Right will always educate and update you on healthy homes and healthy lifestyle.

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