5 Reasons Why You Should Seal Your Stamped Concrete Floors

stamped concrete floors

You’ve probably heard the advice on one website or another or perhaps even from your contractor: seal your stamped concrete floors. But do you know why that’s such popular advice? If you’re facing the decision of whether you should seal your stamped concrete floors or not, here are 5 reasons why you should spring for the extra service. And with extremely skilled contractors like Concrete Surfacing Las Vegas with years of experience sealing concrete floors available, the option is never too late.

1. Sealing improves the floor’s appearance

Some people may opt to apply a sealer to their floors simply because it improves the look of the stamped concrete. When you apply a glossy sealer on top of stamped concrete, you will notice that its color becomes more vibrant and its design more prominent. You can also choose the level of shine you want on your floors, so the choice of vibrancy is within your control. But if you don’t want to take the glossy route, matte sealers also give the floors an elegant sophistication that will look beautiful outdoors.

2. It helps prevent efflorescence

stamped concrete floors

Efflorescence can be a big problem for people with outdoor concrete floors as it ruins the integrity and appearance of the space. Efflorescence refers to the buildup of a powdery white substance on the surface of the floor that comes from salt within the concrete mixing with water on the surface. When a stamped concrete floor is sealed, it stops water from entering the concrete and mixing with the salt, thus preventing the reaction and the build-up on the floors.

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3. Sealing prevents stains

Concrete on its own is not particularly stain-resistant, as its porous nature attracts stains. A simple way to combat this is to seal your stamped concrete floor. Because sealers act as protective layers over concrete floors, chemicals and other things that would usually stain a stamped concrete floor will simply sit on the surface until you can wipe them off. Whether it is Texan or Las Vegas flooring you own, say goodbye to worries of spilling drinks on your stamped patio. And if you want to be extra cautious about the possibility of stains, you will have to remember to reseal your floors every year.

4. Your floors won’t fade under UV rays

stamped concrete floors

If you own outdoor flooring, you may already have heard that sun exposure can cause some problems to concrete floors that have been treated with a colorant, which is usually the case for stamped concrete floors. This can affect the quality of the concrete slab as well as the appearance of the floor, which your contractor probably spent a lot of time working on. So if you have floors in sunny areas like Las Vegas flooring, you may find that your unsealed floors are more susceptible to fading. By applying a special UV-stable sealer on your stamped concrete floors, you can protect your flooring from fading and protect yourself from the high costs of replacing the flooring. 

5. It prevents freeze-thaw damage

Concrete floors are extremely prone to cracking. This is because of a process called freeze-thaw which happens almost everywhere in the country. It works like this: unsealed concrete has open pores that water and ice enter during the winter season. This causes the concrete to be filled up, almost past the maximum capacity point. This makes the concrete expand, and you may already notice that some cracks will begin to form on the surface. When winter ends and that water evaporates, the concrete goes back to its original size. This cycle, where concrete expands and contracts repeatedly, eventually leads to severe cracking on the surface. But things can be done to prevent the worst of the damage: namely, sealing. By sealing your stamped concrete floors, you stop the entry of water and ice into the floors, stopping the cycle at the get-go.

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